Top 5 Best Dual Voltage Curling Irons

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No Time? My pick for the best dual voltage curling iron is the Conair Double Ceramic Curling Iron.

I don’t normally travel with hair appliances, but a friend’s recent destination wedding had me searching for a curling iron that I could take with me. As I needed a new curler anyway, I figured I might as well find the best dual voltage curling iron around so I can have fabulous curls no matter where I am.

We’ll be reviewing the following curling irons in this article:

The 5 Best Dual Voltage Curling Irons

Conair Double Ceramic Curling Iron

 

Have you ever wondered why your hair isn’t styling properly, only to find out you accidentally switched your curler off? This annoys me to no end in the mornings when I’m rushing to get out the door. 

With Conair’s Double Ceramic Curling Iron, that shouldn’t happen anymore. The power and turbo boost buttons are indented, making it difficult to turn off your curler inadvertently.

A 1” barrel helps you create even, natural curls from root to end.There are 30 different temperature settings, adjusted by turning the dial around the base of the barrel. It gets up to a maximum of 400°F and heats up quickly. 

Another great feature is the turbo heat function that kicks the temperature up 27°F instantly. It’s nice for when you’re struggling to style a stubborn section that just won’t look the way you want. 

I really love the rose gold color and how affordable it is. There might be a trade-off with it’s longevity though – some users have experienced it dying within a year of purchase. The barrel tip also gets hot to the touch.

Pros:

  • Double coating of ceramic protects hair from high heat
  • Turbo heat function for instant temperature boost
  • Adjustable heat settings
  • Budget-friendly
  • 120/240V compatibility

Cons:

  • Numbered heat settings don’t specify actual temperature
  • 5’ cord is on the short side

>> Check Price <<

Bed Head Curlipops Curling Wand

 

If you’re looking for a travel curling wand that offers both quality and affordability, the Bed Head Curlipops Curling Wand might be the one for you. 

The 1” tourmaline ceramic barrel helps you achieve a natural look both at home and abroad. The tourmaline produces negative ions when heated to tame frizz into smooth shiny tresses, which is especially handy if you’re traveling to a humid destination.

The barrel will produce uniform curls, but don’t fret about an unnatural look. There’s no clamp, so you won’t need to worry about dents or creases. If you leave your ends out, you’ll get a natural-looking beach wave.

Reaching temperatures of up to 400°F means this device can tackle even the most challenging hair.

Hands up if you’re always burning yourself with a curling iron? This wand comes with a heat-protective glove and also has a cool barrel tip so you can hold onto it without burning yourself.

My biggest beef with the Bed Head Curling Wand is that you can’t control the temperature. It’s only got an On/Off switch, so I don’t recommend this for those of you with ultra-fine or damaged hair.

Pros:

  • Ceramic and tourmaline barrel smooths out frizz
  • Won’t leave creases in your hair
  • Heat-protective glove included
  • Cool tip
  • 120/240V compatibility

Cons:

  • Only one heat setting
  • No auto shut-off

>> Check Price <<

Revlon Perfect Heat ¾” Curling Iron

 

For those of you with short hair, the Revlon ¾” Perfect Heat Curling Iron produces tighter curls and makes it easier to work with when you don’t have much length up top. The thinner barrel makes using the iron near your scalp and around your ears and nape easier.

A triple ceramic coating ensures an even temperature to prevent hot spots from burning your hair. There’s no need to worry about frizz either as this material keeps it to a minimum. 

The maximum temperature setting is 400°F, and is adjustable with 30 different heat settings. Fine-haired gals can enjoy a lower setting, while those with more difficult locks can crank up the heat.

For safety, there’s a 60-minute automatic shut-off and a 360° swivel cord. It’s nice and lightweight at less than a pound, so it’s easy to travel with and won’t tire your arms out while styling.

Lastly, this dual voltage curling iron features a full-length clamp. Even if you’ve had little experience with hair curling before, this makes it quick and easy to use. 

The affordable price means you don’t have to think about spending too much money on a travel appliance. This is especially useful if you’re using this curling iron as a backup option.

Pros:

  • Great for tight, bouncy curls, and shorter hair
  • Auto shut-off after 60 minutes
  • Full-length clamp ideal for beginners 
  • 30 adjustable heat settings
  • Lightweight

Cons:

  • Easy to accidentally change temperature while styling

>> Check Price <<

Beachwaver Co. S1 Curling Iron

 

Let’s get brutally honest with ourselves for a minute. Are you coordinated enough to curl your hair yourself?

If you prefer to have your appliance do the actual curling for you, the Beachwaver S1 Curling Iron might be just the thing for you. It auto-rotates at the push of a button. (Cause really, who likes to do all that manual wrapping?)

It has a ceramic barrel that ensures an even distribution of heat without compromising the temperature. You can set the heat anywhere from 290° to 410°F, so it’s low and high enough for all hair types.

The controls are easy and intuitive to use. At the bottom of the handle is a power button and temperature controls above it. On top of those two buttons is the digital display telling you what heat setting you’ve selected.

There’s a short clamp to secure your ends against the barrel. Hold the iron vertically and clip a section of hair about an inch or two above your ends. Then, press the large circular button in either direction, which will auto-twirl your tresses around the barrel. Just make sure to release the button so it stops turning before the iron touches your scalp.

You can even control the speed of rotation – slow or fast. (Start with the slow option when you’re first starting out.) There’s also a Home button that resets the position of the clamp from the back to the front.

The ergonomic handle is easy to hold with a comfortable, secure grip. And, it’s also dual voltage, so you can travel with it too. 

These nifty features don’t come cheap, but if you’re curl-challenged and aren’t good with curling irons, it might be worth the investment.

Pros:

  • Digital controls and display
  • Ceramic barrel with internal heaters for even heat distribution
  • Auto-rotating barrel curls in both directions
  • Comfortable handle
  • 8’ swivel cord gives you plenty of maneuver room

Cons:

  • Not cheap
  • Not the best for tighter curls

>> Check Price <<

Herstyler Grande Curling Wand

 

Styling your hair can be a bit of a predicament sometimes. You may love the look, but there’s also that nagging voice inside your head that’s telling you too much heat causes damage. Fortunately, with this one, that shouldn’t be a problem anymore.

The Herstyler Grande Curling Wand uses negative ion technology to retain moisture in your hair and protect it from drying out. It also helps keep frizz to a minimum, which is great for curly hair or that humid summer heat.

The 1” barrel is slightly tapered, allowing you to produce natural-looking curls that are wider at the top. It gets to 400°F, which is the only setting. I would only use this if you have healthy, medium to coarse hair.

There’s a heat-protective glove included with the iron to save you from burns. To top it off, it comes in 3 different color choices – black, purple or pink. If you like pretty tools in addition to pretty hair, you’ll be thrilled.

Pros:

  • Negative ion technology smooths frizz
  • Slightly tapered barrel for a more natural curl
  • 360° swivel cord
  • Fun color options

Cons:

  • Only one heat setting
  • Teflon-coating tends to wear off over time

>> Check Price <<

What Is a Dual Voltage Curling Iron?

A dual voltage curling iron is one that will work on both 110-120 volts and 220-240 volts when plugged in. Electrical systems differ around the world, with countries like the U.S. and Canada operating on 110/120V while most of Europe and Asia operate on 220/240V.

This means that you won’t need a power converter to change the voltage from one system to another when using your curler in another country. However, you may still need a travel adapter to fit your plug into the outlet.

Benefits of a Dual Voltage Curling Iron

The main advantage of a dual voltage curling iron is that you can use it anywhere in the world without a converter. You won’t need to purchase another curler if you’re travelling overseas and want to style your hair. 

Aside from that, many dual voltage curling irons are made to be travel-friendly, such as being lightweight and having a longer cord, which comes in handy if you’re staying in a place that doesn’t have an outlet near the mirror you’re using.

Also, many of the same features you’d look for in any quality curling iron – such as barrel material, auto shut-off, and fast heat-up – are usually found in both single and dual voltage irons.

How Do I Know If My Curling Iron Is Dual Voltage?

The simplest way to tell is to check the appliance itself. There’ll usually be a small sticker or engraving with some product information on it, including the voltage type.

You want to see something like 110-240V to indicate that your curling iron is dual voltage. If you only see 110/120V or 220/240V, then your appliance is not dual voltage and you’ll need to find another option.

If you can’t find the sticker on your appliance, try searching the Internet. Type in the model and check the relevant information for the product – you should be able to find out quickly enough.

What Happens If I Use a Single Voltage Curler Abroad?

hand putting plug into electrical socket 

If you’re lucky, the country you travel to will be on the same voltage system your curler uses. If it’s different, a couple things might happen if you don’t use a converter:

  1. Your curler won’t work.
  2. The extra voltage might fry your curling iron. 

Needless to say, this is not just undesirable, it might be dangerous too. With a dual voltage curler, you won’t have to worry about short-circuiting your styler.

Features to Look For 

Aside from making sure that the curling iron is indeed dual voltage, here are other things you should look for when choosing the right curler for you:

Barrel Material

Your hair type usually determines which barrel material is the best for you. The most common options are:

  • Ceramic: This is an ideal choice for normal to weak hair. The temperature remains constant throughout the barrel. There’ll be no hot spots that can cause damage because of this.
  • Titanium: It’s a tougher material than ceramic, offering the ability to reach high temperatures with ease. This makes it suitable for thick or coarse hair types, though anyone can use it.
  • Tourmaline: You’ll keep heat damage to a minimum with this semi-precious gemstone. It uses negative ion technology to lock in natural moisture for increased protection. It’s usually combined with ceramic for a double dose of frizz control and smoothness.

Barrel Size

It’s fairly obvious that smaller, tighter curls requires a narrower barrel, while big bouncy waves are best produced with wider ones.

The standard 1” diameter barrel is the most versatile as it’s capable of creating Shirley Temple-style ribbon curls as well as looser, bigger waves. How you wrap your hair around the barrel as well as how long you hold the curl before releasing will determine the kind of curl you’ll get.

Generally speaking, if you have shoulder-length or shorter hair, don’t go any larger than 1” because you won’t have enough hair to wrap around the rod. This is true even if you want waves instead of curls.

You’ll want hair down to around mid-back or longer for 1 ¼” to 1 ½”. Remember, barrels this wide will give you more voluminous, bouncy curls. You can also brush out your style to achieve a casual, wavy look.

Iron, Wand, or Auto-Rotating

If you’re a beginner, your best option is probably a curling iron, sometimes referred to as a curling tong. A curling iron has a clip on the barrel that holds your hair in place while you wrap it around the rod.

If you’re quite comfortable using a standard curling iron, you might want to consider a curling wand, which has no clamp. It’s a bit more work to hold your hair against the barrel, but you’ll avoid creases caused by a clamp.

 

If you need a device that’s super quick and easy to use, you can choose an automatic curler. You just place your hair into the iron and it’ll do the rest of the work for you. All you have to do is maintain your grip during the process.

Temperature Settings

It’s always best to have adjustable heat settings for any hairstyler you go with. Enough said.

Barrel Shape

Curlers come in different shapes for different looks. A cylindrical iron will create uniformly wide curls for a more classic, finished look, while a conical curling wand will give you a more modern, natural-looking wave. 

The tapered barrel shape gives your hair more volume up top. Make sure to hold the wand with the tip facing downwards and wrap from the wider end of the barrel down.

Curling Tips and Tricks

Prep

  • Start with clean, dry hair: Wash and completely dry hair before starting. You’ll get the best results this way and have less buildup to deal with when you’re done styling.
  • Protect: Use some heat-protection serum or cream beforehand. That’ll help to prevent any damage caused by your curling iron.
  • Use an appropriate heat setting: If your curler has an adjustable heat setting, pick the right one for your hair. If you’re not sure what that temperature is, start with a lower setting and gradually increase it.

Style

  • Curl 1” sections: Separate your hair into layers and use clips to keep the sections separate. Don’t try to wrap too much hair at a time for best results.
  • (Optional) Spritz sections with hairspray before wrapping: For piece-y, well-defined curls, use a bit of flexible hold hairspray and comb through each section to coat your strands before wrapping. This is also good if you have coarse or style-resistant tresses. 
  • Style bottom layers first: Start with the bottom section and make your way through each layer til you get to the top.
  • Curl technique: Wrap hair from the root and work your way down. Leave your ends off if you want a more natural look.
  • Keep your hair on the barrel for 8-10 seconds max: This should give you a defined curl and minimizes damage. 
  • Let cool and finish: When you’re done, let your curls cool before running your fingers or brush through your locks. Finish with hairspray all around!

Travel and Safety Tips

Let’s Get Curling

It was a close one, but the best dual voltage curling iron in my book is the Conair Double Ceramic Curling Iron.

It’s more than just a good iron for traveling. It’s great for use at home too.

The double-coating of ceramic keeps annoying hot spots away, and the adjustable temperature settings make it suitable for just about every hair type. The instant turbo-heat boost is really nice to get those resistant sections too.

What’s your favorite travel curling iron?



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